Friday, July 21, 2006

is this just another "Jesus Is My Boyfriend" song?


Yesterday, my summer missions partner, Amanda and I had a heated discussion when a song came on the Christian radio station.

Is this song referring to a Significant Other or to God?

And if an SO, does it belong on Christian radio?

What do you think of the lyrics?

18 comments:

Melissa said...

Definitely a significant other. (What a sterile, tentative term. I hate that term) I think it is clear enough that the object of the song is a person other than Christ. *grin* I don't like "Jesus is my Boyfriend" songs either.

Romantic love songs which praise God and speak of commitment and unconditional love? I think they have a place in "Christian radio." Just as they should have a place in everyday Christian life. Just like we could ask, "Does the Song of Solomon belong in the Bible?"

sajini said...

umm Its a big first dance for weddings out here... yeah definitly a song for lovebirds!!

Scott said...

I think it's a relationship song, which doesn't mean it shouldn't be on Christian radio. To me, the Christian radio I have here locally (KLove) doesn't play enough relationship music. Having and maintaining a relationship is not easy, and it's good to have some encouragement in that arena in the form of song. If we leave all the love songs to secular music, we end up with a high divorce rate in the church. Oh wait...

Chris said...

Do you think that perhaps the question might be, instead, "should we have Christian radio?"

Perhaps this is unfair, but I've never liked so-called "Christian" radio. I mean, it's not like the songs themselves made some choice to follow Jesus, nor did the cd player they're played on. I'm just a bit skeptical of the whole lot, especially because they play so many "Jesus my Boyfriend" songs, or all the hokey songs with the horrible choir singing in the background. At least, they did in my hometown.

And isn't that song a country song that's been over-played on like, every country radio station in America?

Warren said...

Our pianist at church just got married, and he sang that song to his bride before they exchanged vows. Caught her totally by surprise.

It's clearly a relationship song, with broader potential applications. I think it's interesting how we can be so restrictive with Christian music and yet talk about the allegory in the Song of Solomon.

Nixter said...

what's that in the glass?

ckhnat said...

a lovely blended mocha

Catherine said...

Never heard that on Christian radio -- but it's been playing on country radio for a couple of years now. Rascal Flatts (country artists) won a CMA award for it last year or the year before. I always understood it be a song one of them had written about a person that they felt God had led them to. I didn't know a Christian artist had done a cover of it.

Priscilla said...

I agree with Scott.

Martha said...

I thank God for bringing my husband into my life. What could be wrong with writing a song about it? My favorite is the one written by Steven Curtis Chapman, In the Morning When You Wake Up... I don't think there is anything unbiblical about a clean love song. (PS. I'm thankful for Christian radio too.)

Priscilla said...

Me too!

ckhnat said...

personally ... typical Christian radio annoys me ... same (often mediocre) songs over and over again! Sheesh!

I appreciate very much the picture God provides us in Song of Solomon of the gift of love and physical relationship between husband and wife. But when theologians attempt to make it into a "type" of the relationship between Christ and the church (us) ... well, that's just a little oogy (you like that word).

If you're going to do that ... turn to Ephesians 5!

Justin said...

Slightly different tack -- I'm preaching on Hosea this Sunday Morning. I do find it ironic that gooey love songs should be used to describe the love that exists between God and us. Often, Hosea is pointed to as evidence that we can use our marriages as an illustration.

But if you take a close read of the prophecy, it is not about gooey love. It’s about painful, stressful, unfaithful love -- and God determined to overcome in spite of the lack of fidelity. It is love with gloves on, and with hands dirty. It’s love that leads then to the cross, not to a song on Christian radio. (Bein’ cheeky).

I do like Michael Card’s: Gomer. But even then, Gomer sounds like a love struck teenager who can't believe that Hosea loves her as she is. But if you read Hosea, she’s is no love struck teenager hoping for her white prophet to sweep her off her feet!

Just got Hosea on my mind, so I thought I’d inject it in there!

PS -- also not sure about Song of S as being about Christ and the church.

Martha said...

My husband has never quite seen the Crist and the church picture in Song of Solomon either. He seems to think of it in a rather different light but I'm not sure I know quite what it is as yet. I'll have to ask him again...

Dawn said...

you know...I can't tell. However, SCC has written love songs before. I guess this difference is he actually said that's what they were instead of leaving the audience to figure it out for themselves.

sajini said...

I just heard this song on the christian radio as I was driving out of Ny(we dont get christian music out here except for family radio). I am guessing they are trying to make the song sound like a christian song.. WHY??? Its a love song to a guy or girl!! Lets keep it that way!!

Anonymous said...

This song was written by Jeff Moore to his wife. Because his friend Steven Curtis Chapman with "I will be here" could best him. It is definitely about a relationship.

Laura said...

OK, super glad that someone else got the Rascal Flatts thing. But it's not by Geoff Moore. It was written by three people who are neither Geoff Moore nor the Rascal Flatts guys. And evidently in the "Christian" version they omitted the bridge which includes the line, "Now I'm just rollin' home into my lover's arms."

Lame. Salvador did the same thing with "How Far is Heaven" a while back. How do Christian musicians ever expect credibility when they're ripping off secular bands?