Saturday, August 19, 2006

how the world sees us

Mike recommends an essay written by a secular journalist in which she describes how the average person perceives evangelicals. You may be tempted to rise up and defend the religious right, but it's well worth a read ... if anything it may humble you and convict you of pride.

I find watching news parodies, such as The Daily Show and The Colbert Report, helpful in that it's a way of removing myself from my Christian subculture to view it through the worldview of society. Why would this be beneficial? For me, it points out many pharisaical tendencies in the church.

Hmm, what do you think?

4 comments:

The Borg said...

I've actually come at things from the other way. That is, I've spent many years of shameful overcorrecting, not wishing to come across as self-righteous or insesitive.

It would be tempting to swing the other way and totally ignore the misunderstandings that secular people have about Christians.

However, I think the best thing to do is have the Gospel of Jesus Christ as the prime motivator of our actions and how we present ourselves to anyone (secular or not). We shouldn't let the way the world percieves us dictate our actions.

ckhnat said...

indeed, you're correct. we ought never to be ashamed of the Gospel ... even when it comes across as foolishness to the world.

Swil said...

If I find something about Christian culture that is not a Christian neccessity uncomfortable, I've started not bothering to work against that. In fact, I make sure it stays uncomfortable. Why? To make sure I'm in the same place as the people I connect with outside the church.

Also, I wish we got Daily Show and Colbert Report over here on a regular basis, we just get a "best of" on Thursday nites that I always forget to watch... those guys are great...

BSJ-rom said...

I had an opposite experience the other night - a mate of mine decided to get rid of his music, video, magazines and stuff cos he was wary of its use, the spiritual side of it and all that. I respect what he did, even his reason for doing it, but I see the implications as being so far reaching, ending, I spose, in asceticsm.

How, from that position can one relate to, firstly, other Christians - who haven't done the same thing. Secondly, with nonchristians-who love the world, talk about the world and know the world? Thirdly, with people who are considering Christianity? Um yeah...I dunno.